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Tinker Ready is editor-in-chief of the Whistleblower Protection Blog.  She has worked with whistleblowers throughout her career as a journalist and investigative reporter.  

The debate over whistleblower protection shifted to the impeachment trial, where another attempt was made to reveal the name of a person some think is the Ukraine Whistleblower. But, an important disclosure didn’t get much attention during the partisan sparring at this week’s House Oversight Committee hearing on whistleblower protections.

Continue Reading Whistleblower advocates have more to say following House hearing

Wednesday’s Congressional hearing on whistleblower protections for federal employees went a little off track at times.

Whistleblower advocates, including David Colapinto, general counsel for National Whistleblower Center, testified about the need for greater protections. Two inspectors general — including Michael Horowitz of the Department of Justice — talked about how the process works.
Continue Reading Oversight hearing: Congress needs to clarify rules on confidentiality for whistleblowers

Edward Snowden, the noted NSA whistleblower, last night spoke up in defense of his partner in…crime? Concern is growing that journalists who use leaked documents are starting to be pursued more aggressively as criminals.

Snowden fled the country after he revealed the National Security Agency’s mass surveillance program. Glenn Greenwald worked with Snowden, wrote about the leaks for the Guardian in 2013 and won a Pulitzer. See the whole thing play out in the documentary, CitizenFour. That won an Oscar.
Continue Reading Snowden: Greenwald charges represent pushback against whistleblowers

Securities and Exchange Commission

In announcing its first two whistleblower awards of the year, the Securities and Exchange Commission notes:

As set forth in the Dodd-Frank Act, the SEC protects the confidentiality of whistleblowers and does not disclose information that could reveal a whistleblower’s identity.
Continue Reading Whistleblower news round-up: DOD, SEC and all the way to Africa

“This all supposedly started because of a whistleblower,” President Trump’s attorney Jay Sekulow said Tuesday during the first day of the Senate impeachment trial. “Where is that whistleblower?” he added as he closed his notebook and walked away from the Senate podium.


Continue Reading Whistleblower still a target for the President’s defense team

Corruption persists worldwide and whistleblowers in many countries risk everything. So, two years ago a group of lawyers, anti-corruption activists and investigative journalists founded PPLAAF – French acronym for Plateforme
Continue Reading African whistleblowers share paper trail to billionaire’s questionable fortune

The business writers at The New York Times promise a bump in white-collar crime news in 2020. At the same time, a series of reports raise concerns about oversight of the accounting industry.

From The Times:

Goldman Sachs is negotiating with the Justice Department to pay a penalty of about $2 billion for its role in the 1Malaysia Development Berhad scandal, known as 1MDB.


Continue Reading 2020 may be a big year for white collar crime, but report cites poor oversight of accounting firms

Corporate compliance programs aim to make sure a company obeys laws and regulations. One problem with compliance — companies can sometimes make more breaking the rules than following them. And they are complicated. So, they mount compliance programs for show and look the other way. That’s where whistleblowers come in. Or go out. Some internal reporting programs work against whistleblowers, so insiders choose to report wrongdoing to a government agency or the press.
Continue Reading Why not beef up corporate compliance before you get caught?  

Whistleblowers helped the government collect $3 billion in fines and recoveries in fiscal year 2019, up from $2.8 billion in 2018.

Medicare and Medicaid were big targets for fraudsters this year, as they have been in years past, according to the annual report from the Department of Justice. The list also includes military contractors, universities and a fish oil producer. Read the full list here.
Continue Reading Whistleblowers help DOJ collect $3 billion in fines and settlements under the False Claims Act