A guest post from Dean Zerbe, senior policy analyst for the National Whistleblower Center and former tax counsel for the Senate Finance Committee.

Tax whistleblowers had good news the other day with the Taxpayer First Act of 2019 (Public Law 116-25) being signed into law – including anti-retaliation protections for tax whistleblowers as well

The  following is an editorial from the National Whistleblower Center:

On August 3, 2016 the U.S. Tax Court ruled that tax whistleblowers were entitled to a reward based on monies collected in criminal fines and penalties. This landmark decision reversed the position of the Department of Treasury that severely limited the “collected proceeds” upon which a whistleblower reward could be based.
Continue Reading

District of Columbia Councilmember Mary Cheh introduced the “False Claims Act of 2013,” which will amend the D.C. False Claims Act to permit whistleblowers to bring tax-related fraud claims. If enacted into law, the bill would permit whistleblowers to seek a qui tam or relator’s share when the amount of uncollected tax is worth $350,000 or more, and brought against taxpayers who have an income above $1 million.
Continue Reading

An article written by Bradley Birkenfeld appears in the Spring 2010 issue of World Policy Journal. The “Crime + Corruption” issue examines how corruption occurs, its effect on society, and how to stop it. Birkenfeld’s article, “Inside the Cartel,” is displayed in the “Upfront” section of the journal, which gives readers first-hand insight into corruption schemes across the globe.
Continue Reading