The release of the Steven Spielberg film The Post (starring Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep) has prompted a new upsurge in interest about whistleblowers. In 1971, Daniel Ellsberg released the Pentagon Papers to the New York Times, Washington Post and other newspapers which published the shocking revelations of how the American people had been lied to about the Vietnam War for decades. Continue Reading NWC Executive Director Stephen Kohn Featured in Washington Post Video

Part of the “Quick Peek” Series, exploring the NEW edition of Stephen Kohn‘s Whistleblower’s Handbook.        

Stephen M. Kohn, Executive Director of the National Whistleblower Center and author of the Whistleblower’s Handbook, asserts that the history of whistleblower laws stems from an attempt to answer the question: “What to do if the boss is a crook?” Many employees see corrupt practices in the workplace but don’t report them because they fear retaliation. But thanks to the fifty-five federal laws protecting whistleblowers from that exact fate, employees are free to report illegal activity without the fear of being fired or other forms of workplace retaliation.

Continue Reading Rule 2: Navigating the Maze

Part of the “Quick Peek” Series, exploring the NEW edition of Stephen Kohn‘s Whistleblower’s Handbook.

Stephen Kohn, Executive Director of the National Whistleblower Center (NWC), underscores that “the single most important rule for whistleblowers is very simple: Follow the money.” Whistleblowing can be a long and difficult road, so before embarking on the journey potential whistleblowers should make sure they know the risk to reward scale is tipping to their favor. Nine federal laws require whistleblower compensation, and over $6.7 billion in rewards has been paid to whistleblowers between 1987 and 2016. Continue Reading Rule 3: Follow the Money